women of colour

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Sci-Fi Writing as a Radical Act  by Niranjana Iyer
 Sci-Fi Writing as a Radical Act

Sci-Fi Writing as a Radical Act

If you don’t read fantasy and science fiction because you think it’s all about heroic loner dudes saving the world—run, don’t walk, to Nalo Hopkinson’s books.

One of the most original, intelligent, imaginative and ambitious voices in fiction today, Hopkinson writes formidable yet playful tales that are masterful meditations on current and future society. Her female protagonists, often marginalized, act as change agents while operating within a strongly rooted family network.

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Domestic Problems  by Sandhya Singh
Domestic Problems

Domestic Problems

BY SANDHYA SINGH

“Here, in Canada, in the 21st century, we have a program that is clearly violating human rights.” So says Cecilia Diocson, executive director of the National Alliance of Philippine Women in Canada (NAPWC).

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Red Rock: Chinese Women Take to the Stage  by Ember Swift
Red Rock: Chinese Women Take to the Stage

Red Rock: Chinese Women Take to the Stage

It was only in 1986 that contemporary rock music began in China. The artist was Cui Jian, and the instruments were a mixture of Western and Eastern styles, featuring screaming electric guitars. He is now seen as the figurehead of the Chinese rock movement.

Since then, the music scene in China has developed at breakneck speed. Now, in what is seen as its fourth generation, there is a burgeoning scene for every musical style. Some compare the Chinese music scene today to the late ’60s of North America.

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The Women of Casa Xochiquetzal  by Annuska Angulo
The Women of Casa Xochiquetzal

The Women of Casa Xochiquetzal

Xochiquetzal (pronounced So-chi-ke-chal) is an Aztec goddess whose name means flower-feather. She represents the divine and spiritual side of the pleasures of the flesh. Xochiquetzal was adored by the ahuianime, the pre- Hispanic prostitutes.
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Filmmaker Tracey Deer  by Tara Michelle Ziniuk
Filmmaker Tracey Deer

Filmmaker Tracey Deer

Tiffany Deer is giggling uncontrollably. Her sister, filmmaker Tracey Deer, is holding the camera and laughing along. The laughter is contagious, the intimacy compelling. This is the opening sequence from Club Native, which, during its 78-minute running time, entertains viewers even as it educates and often challenges them.

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Rwanda Genocide Victims Speak Out  by Sandra Ka Hon Chu and Anne-Marie de Brouwer
Rwanda Genocide Victims Speak Out

Rwanda Genocide Victims Speak Out

In the 100 days of genocide that ravaged the small Central African nation of Rwanda from April until July 1994, about one million Tutsi and Hutu people were killed, and an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 women and girls were raped.

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Pump up the Volume: Tanya Tagaq Adds New Sound to a Centuries-Old Women’s Cultural Tradition  by Megan Perry
Pump up the Volume: Tanya Tagaq Adds New Sound to a Centuries-Old Women’s Cultural Tradition

Pump up the Volume: Tanya Tagaq Adds New Sound to a Centuries-Old Women’s Cultural Tradition

Throat singing isn’t a sound that’s easy to describe, even for Tanya Tagaq, so she relies on comparisons.

“It’s breath, it’s rhythm. To be very, well, pompous about it, it’s like the sushi of sound.”

She shakes her head, laughing. “When you hear it, you either love it or you hate it.”

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The Sweet Taste of Lemonade  by Cheryl Thompson
The Sweet Taste of Lemonade

The Sweet Taste of Lemonade

Beyoncé Giselle Knowles-Carter never ceases to amaze audiences. For nearly 20 years, she has consistently recreated herself, her music and her brand.

It is easy to forget that she began her career in 1998 at age of 16 as part of the girl group Destiny’s Child. Since then, she’s become one of the most recognized R&B/pop singers in the world—and one of the most critiqued. With each album, listeners delve into her creative subconscious, and her latest (sixth) solo project, Lemonade, is no exception.

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The Fight For Dignity: Women With Disabilities  by Sandhya Singh
The Fight For Dignity: Women With Disabilities

The Fight For Dignity: Women With Disabilities

In 2007, 19-year-old Ashley Smith died in federal custody at the Grand Valley Institution for Women in Kitchener, Ontario.

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Temporary Workers, Permanent Problems  by Sandhya Singh
Temporary Workers, Permanent Problems

Temporary Workers, Permanent Problems

Laura came to Canada from Mexico to work as a seasonal apple picker under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. She fell on the job, and her legs were crushed by a tractor.

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