Cindy Filipenko

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Serena Ryder. Fight. Surrender. Balance  by Cindy Filipenko
Serena Ryder. Fight. Surrender. Balance

Serena Ryder. Fight. Surrender. Balance

Ten years ago, singer-songwriter Serena Ryder came to national prominence with the release of the single “Weak in the Knees.”

A heartbreakingly beautiful ballad about unrequited love, the single garnered Ryder a Juno for best new artist, the first of what is now a handful of the Canadian music awards.

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Serena Ryder Rides High on Success  by Cindy Filipenko
Serena Ryder Rides High on Success

Serena Ryder Rides High on Success

It’s a couple of days after the U.S. election and Serena Ryder is still enraptured by U.S. president Barack Obama’s victory.

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When it Cliks  by Cindy Filipenko
When it Cliks

When it Cliks

Three years ago, The Cliks were a semi-professional trio playing the usual gigs available to openly queer bands.

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Anti DiFranco: Spitfire  by Cindy Filipenko
Anti DiFranco: Spitfire

Anti DiFranco: Spitfire

Ani DiFranco’s commitment to being a free agent is inspiring.

While the indie musician is definitely concerned about the state of her country, she’s not particularly worried about the impact George W. Bush’s administration has had on civil liberties—not on hers, anyway.

“As Utah Phillips would say, ‘The amount you resist is the amount you are free.' And I think I will always resist this basic encroachment on my human rights, so I will always feel free. “

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Reach for the Stars  by Cindy Filipenko
Reach for the Stars

Reach for the Stars

Fair-skinned girls who want mainstream acceptance aren’t singing about gender politics or First Nations’ issues, either, but that’s exactly what makes Kinnie Starr stand out.

Favourably compared in the music press to Lauryn Hill, PJ Harvey and Ani Difranco, Starr has spent her 10-year career on the edge of mainstream success. Her first album came out in 1996 and she has worked steadily—albeit often independently—since then.

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Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music  by Cindy Filipenko
Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music

Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music

It’s a typical muggy July afternoon in Vancouver. Inside the Commodore Ballroom—a relic from the ’20s restored to its art deco splendour five years ago—the Indigo Girls’ sound check is dragging.

Amy Ray, the dark-haired Indigo Girl known for her gravelly vocals and edgier songwriting style, is a little frustrated as she runs through the evening’s set list and corrects the levels for the duo’s plethora of stringed instruments.

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Tuning in to Time's Up  by Cindy Filipenko
Tuning in to Time's Up

Tuning in to Time's Up

Before there was Time’s Up, the U.S. movement addressing gender inequality in the entertainment industry, Across the Board had begun its campaign for greater gender parity in the Canadian music industry.

Founded in the spring of 2017 by music industry veterans Joanne Setterington and Keely Kemp, Across the Board is pushing for half of all seats on the boards of critical Canadian music organizations to be filled by women. After all, the music industry’s boards advocate on behalf of all artists, about half of whom are women.

Imaginings

CDImage: 
Artist: 
Hilary Grist
Label: 
Independent
Review by: 
Cindy Filipenko

Cabaret cool meets ethereal pop, then gets completely subjugated by the wittiest lyrics to recent memory—welcome to Hilary Grist and her new CD, Imaginings. Grist is best known as a CBC artist, as national radio is one of the few places her brand of eclectic pop fits.

Hannah Georgas

CDImage: 
Artist: 
Hannah Georgas
Label: 
Hidden Pony
Review by: 
Cindy Filipenko

Calling a CD This is Good is a ballsy move, as it opens up an artist to all kinds of nasty remarks that pass for wit when scrawled by snide music reviewers.

Funk This

CDImage: 
Artist: 
Chaka Khan
Label: 
Burgundy Records
Review by: 
Chaka Khan
Ever since her early days fronting the band Rufus, when she implored us to “Tell Me Something Good,” Chaka Khan has had unmistakable pipes. The funk equivalent of Gladys Knight, Khan has been an underrated vocalist for most of her career. Sure, she has eight Grammy awards, but what good are tiny golden gramophones when your music isn’t getting out to the masses? How good is she? Well, she’s probably the only woman capable of taking a Prince song and making it her own.
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